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<chillingcompetition.com

<chillingcompetition.com>

…So I am constantly overwhelmed by what I don’t know. Every time I feel like I am making progress in life and really figuring my career/the big picture/whatever out, I’m exposed to something that completely humbles me.

…Sometimes (always?) this is a little maddening: No matter how much I learn about my field, it seems like I am not learning enough; And no matter how much I expose myself to, I feel like I am always missing something. At times my knowledge base feels broad but shallow, and at other times it feels far too narrow. I’m sure part of these feelings are just driven by a good old fashioned case of impostor syndrome… but mostly I just have a long ways to go before I’m a subject matter expert on anything in HR and/or business.

…I periodically peruse the Linkedin profiles of friends/colleagues/total strangers in my field to get a sense of what they’re learning and doing (to help me figure out if I’m focusing on the right things). And having done quite a bit of this – in addition to reading this and that – over the past few years, I now have a few vague notions of what I’m doing right/wrong; for example, I know that much of my recent work has been far too transactional – I need to spend less of my time driving processes and more of it managing projects that have significant business impacts. And I feel like I need to hone in on a specialty (although this doesn’t necessarily mean I should leave Generalist work behind). I am determined to make this specialty data analytics… but sometimes I very much feel like I am failing at developing this skill set the way I should.

…Right now there are a lot of things that I’m doing for the first time, and I mostly do them well (or at least okayish), but I could more or less always do them better if I only had more time to hone my skill set on the “insert various thing here” that I’m working on as opposed to just executing on it to completion and then moving on to the next thing. Speaking of which… I am getting good at executing, which is a plus. By this I mean that while I may not have worked on “insert whatever here” before, I can now quickly understand most problems, identify the stakeholders I need to involve/influence to fix the problem, identify the fastest action plan to solve it/get from point A to point B, and then implement said action plan to get there. And this feels like something approaching a skill – or at least a competency.

…This is just a Friday morning thought stream for everyone else wondering if they’re taking the steps they need to take to be VP/President/whatever of _____________ in 5/10/15 years. And for everyone still reading, here is a wonderful insight from HR Exec Kris Dunn on how to get a passive candidate interested in a role. I was initially going to write about my thoughts on this and changed my mind (as you can read above), but I really love the insight and so want to share it today anyway:

…candidates who don’t direct apply to your position love to be considered “passive” candidates, even though they become active the minute they say they’re interested. With that in mind, you ought to start every conversation with a candidate you sourced (they didn’t directly apply) by telling them what you are looking for, then asking them who they know who might be a fit.

You didn’t ask them if they were interested. That’s a compliment to them. But don’t worry – if what you’re selling is attractive, they’ll be happy to tell you.

…Check the piece that the above quote came from here (I think I may add the above to my recruiting toolkit).

And as always, please share your thoughts in the comments section below.

Best,

Rory

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